Do you want to get pregnant over 40?

If you are a woman considering having your first baby over the age of 40, you are in good company.  Getting Pregnant over 40 is more common now than ever.  While the risks are higher than when you were in your 20’s, many women over the age of 35, 40 or even 45 are fertile and having healthy babies every day.  (See the March of Dimes statistics on moms over 35.)
 

Pregnancy over 40!


According to the CDC, women over 40 are the only group with increasing birth rates.  Pew Research (read the article) reports that, “in 1990, there were more births to teenagers than to women ages 35 and older. By 2008, that had reversed — 14% of births were to older women and 10% were to teens. Births to women ages 35 and older grew 64% between 1990 and 2008, increasing in all major race and ethnic groups.”  One in five women in America has their first child at age 35 or older. The numbers of mothers with a first time pregnancy over 40 are growing steadily. As a group, we generally have higher incomes and higher levels of education.  We have achieved career success and lived full lives but realize that something is missing.  I designed this site because I was 44 and thought it was too late to have a baby.  I searched for information to help me through the process and couldn’t find a site that specifically related to me.  So I designed this site to help other women in my situation.  My goal is to provide an informative place for women trying to get pregnant over 40 to go throughout their pregnancy process to learn, share information, and get support. 

Fertility with age has challenges.  I have included both technical and very honest practical information including common fertility and infertility tests ordered for women over 35 and things you should know, but might not have heard, about recovering from labor with pregnancy after 40.  Where expert information is available, I have provided links to that information rather than re-creating the wheel.  I hope you find the information helpful and welcome your feedback on topics not listed that you would like to learn more about.

I left a career as a corporate executive to focus on getting pregnant over 40.  I am now 45 years old with a healthy little infant daughter and considering having a second child!  Giving birth to my daughter has enriched my life tremendously and changed me in ways I couldn’t have imagined.  In “What It Took for Me to Finally Get Pregnant”, I share a thumbnail of what it took for me to get my precious daughter. 

I am happy to answer questions and am hopeful that this site helps provide support.  for other women over 40 who long to have a baby of their own.  I learned so much through this amazing journey of infertility and fertility with age and hope it will help other women.  Good luck and blessings!!   

All my best,
Deborah

10 thoughts on “Do you want to get pregnant over 40?”

  1. Deborah!!! Your story is just what I needed to hear as I am just now researching and determined to try and have a baby. Just curious why at age 44 you did IUI and not IVF. Isn’t there better stats with IVF, especially because of our advanced age and old eggs;(?

    Layla

  2. HIDeborah

    So happy to read stories like yours!!!I am 41 years old and trying to conceive.Had one IVF done andturned out a chemical pregnancy.Tried second IVF but was cancelled as no follicles were visible.AMP reading of 0.58% and FSH of 7.8.All hormone levels within the normal range – nothing wrong BUT my age!!Doctors not keen to carry on with treatment and now want me to consider donor eggs!!I am NOT ready for that as I feel I cannot just give up!!Any advice or hope for me??No children

  3. Hello. I really need encouragement. I have healthy twin girls age 10. I had them when I was 31. ow, I am 41 an pregnant. I keep thinking about how old I will be as the baby gets older. I often think about health risks. I reallt need encouragement from other women who has expereinced this. I am also a strong christian and believe God will get me through this. Thanks

    1. Hi! First, congratulations on your baby! I understand how you feel about worrying about the baby’s health. I am contemplating a second child at 46 and that is my primary concern. The good news is that lots of older women (myself included at age 44) have healthy babies every day! As far as being “old” as the baby grows – you are only as old as you feel. If you take care of yourself and are active, you will be a wonderful active mom to your new little one. I do more physical things with my daughter than most of my mom friends in their 30’s. I am also in the best physical condition of my life because I choose to be for my daughter (and myself). Hang in there and focus on the positives. ( Stress is not a helpful thing during pregnancy!) Sending you blessings and positive energy.

      Deborah

  4. Hi there,

    I was nearly 39 years when I had my first baby, 40 years when the second was born and 43 with the third. This seems crazy but I need to have one more baby. Just wondering…………………. I see lots of mums saying I had a baby at 45 years and it was healthy. I never hear mums who did not have a healthy baby, are there none? I am so worried about having another baby and for it not to be healthy. Can someone shed some light pls?

  5. Deborah

    Thank you for your time and reply. It is a wonder and I have been researching and yet there are ‘no real answers.’ I am prepared to do all the testing as I did with all my three children but nonetheless it would be nice to be better informed.

    Cheers and the best of luck to you with whatever you decide.

    I will keep you informed as to my outcome. Fingers crossed, as I am now taking clomid – never have done that before. My other three were all done naturally, hence my serious concerns.

  6. It is no longer news to learn that a woman in her 40s is having her first child and you wonder why it has taken so long before deciding to have a baby. Some have said 40 is the new 30, but you also get people who think 30 is too old to start a family. Opinion on when to start and stop having children differs.

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